Reporting-Blog

Information Design & Visual Business Intelligence


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Dashboarding Rule No.1: Use a Tile Structured Design

Microsoft, Sony, Netflix and others all use the modern and intuitive tile structure. It is easily adaptable to different device sizes, from desktops to smartphones. Just as you want to have a preview of the Netflix series, it is also useful to have an overview of a data set. Tiles can have different layouts in dashboards. The simplest version is a link to the report – but the more information there is on the tile, the greater the added value.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.

The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.


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Information Design Rule No.8: Select Diagrams Supporting Your Message

Why do we create diagrams? To deliver a specific message. This goal is achieved even better if you choose a diagram that supports the information. For example, the pie chart is the best way to display parts of a whole. We recommend that you display only two elements and distinguish them in color. Although bar charts and column charts are similar, their application is different: the former can show good structures and the latter is better suited to time histories. Line graphs show trends and correlations can be represented by scatter plots, for example. And this is only the beginning to visualize information smartly.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.


The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.


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Information Design Rule No.7: Use Deviations Instead of Signs

At first glance, traffic lights seem to be a good idea – the signal colors are immediately understood, simple and everyone knows them from everyday life. However, a company cannot be equated with road traffic. It is much more complex, which is why more information has to be conveyed than individual terms such as „stop – attention – go“ or, as in our case, „good – medium – bad“. Traffic lights also do not convey how pronounced a tendency is and can even lead to wrong interpretations. There are several better alternatives to traffic lights. One of them is the representation of deviations in bars and columns in percentages or absolute values. Because of clear values and visualized characteristics, they say much more and thus offer a high added value.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.


The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.


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Our Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package is now available in english!

You would like to get closer to your goal of a data-driven company and learn more about the disciplines Information Design, Visual Business Intelligence and Visual Analytics?

If so, our Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package is just the right thing for you to start with! Download it here.

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Click here for more information about the reportingimpulse Academy!


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Information Design Rule No.6: Use Visual Tables

A clear recommendation and also often used are visual tables. Therefor standardized tables are enriched by graphics. Micro charts are for example used before the description and the choice of the chart type depends on whether you want to see proportions, developments or trends. Within the data, the representation of absolute and/or percentage deviations is very popular. These can also be visually distinguished by thick and thin bars. In this way, outliers can be identified at one glance instead of first having to compare numbers.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.

The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.


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Information Design Rule No.5: Use Highlights

After a chart has been reduced (see rule no.2), highlighting can now be used consciously. It guides the reader and shows which information is particularly important. A color or shape that differs from the rest automatically attracts the reader’s attention. A standardized highlighting color should be used for all dashboarding. There are many possible applications – for example, the current value can be marked during developments and columns or only individual values can be highlighted in tables. Highlights are also useful for commenting. If there is a high information density, even an entire diagram can be colored or framed.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.

The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.


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Information Design Rule No.4: Use Information Density

Do you know the change blindness effect? According to it, we cannot remember all the information in similar consecutive images and do not perceive major changes. This impairs the comparability of charts. But if you increase the density of information on one page, you can compare several charts at once and provide even more information about the data by e.g. implementing microcharts and highlights. And don’t worry – if tourists can manage it with a subway map, your colleagues won’t have any problems with the high information density.

This rule and others are explained in detail in the reportingimpulse Academy. Get your Visual Data Analytics Beginner’s Package here! In addition to our most important rules for dashboarding, it includes learning videos on the corresponding topic, book recommendations, reportingimpulse SharePics and much more.

The poster with all Information Design and Dashboarding rules is available in our shop.